Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction Performance Audit Released

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Columbus – A performance audit of the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (ODRC) released today by Auditor of State Dave Yost outlines recommendations to save tax dollars by improving data quality and collection. 

“Better data drives better performance,” Auditor Yost said. “And when we can use that information to serve taxpayers at a lower cost, that’s a win-win for Ohioans.” 

The performance audit analyzed ODRC’s fleet management and found savings could occur through the use of telematics, as well as identified areas where the agency could improve its data quality. 

Auditors reported that ODRC’s available data on its fleet was not sufficiently reliable to conduct analyses on vehicle utilization and cycling. The review found a substantial amount of missing and inaccurate data in the FleetOhio management information system for required fields such as annual mileage, fuel cost and maintenance costs. A utilization analysis can yield savings opportunities by identifying individual vehicles that fail to meet a usage threshold such as annual mileage or hours in operation and should be sold. A cycling analysis can yield savings opportunities by calculating the most cost-effective point in a vehicle’s life at which to replace it with a new vehicle (cycle out).

The performance audit recommended ODRC invest in telematics hardware to obtain basic operating data, such as annual vehicle mileage, vehicle utilization, odometer readings, fuel usage and cost, maintenance usage and cost, engine hours, and preventative maintenance schedules. Through the use of the information gathered by the telematics hardware, auditors found ODRC could reduce costs by $347,807 annually. After using these savings to recoup the initial capital investment, ODRC could realize net annual savings of $202,807. 

Legislation championed by Auditor Yost in 2011 requires performance audits be conducted of at least four state agencies each biennium. Other state agencies chosen to undergo performance audits this biennium include the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, the Ohio Department of Transportation, and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. 

A full copy of this report may be accessed online.



The Auditor of State’s office, one of five independently elected statewide offices in Ohio, is responsible for auditing more than 5,800 state and local government agencies.  Under the direction of Auditor Dave Yost, the office also provides financial services to local governments, investigates and prevents fraud in public agencies and promotes transparency in government.

Brittany Halpin
Press Secretary